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Nov 28, 2021, 1:42 am

ORMET PRIMARY ALUMINUM CORP CERCLIS Site

EPA Identifier: 110000384888
CERCLIS ID: 110000384888
Location:
39.705, -80.84166

Address:
43840 STATE ROUTE 7
HANNIBAL, OH

Create Date: 01-MAR-00
Update Date: 07-FEB-13
Final Date: 19870722


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SIC Codes: 3334
SIC Descriptions:
PRIMARY PRODUCTION OF ALUMINUM
Programs: {AIRS/AFS,BR,CER
Program Interests:
AIR MAJOR, COMPLIANCE ACTIVITY,

NAICS Descriptions:
PRIMARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION.
Site Summary:
Federal Register Notice:  July 22, 1987

Conditions at proposal (September 18, 1985): Ormet Corp. operates a primary aluminum smelter on a 200-acre tract of land on the Ohio River in Hannibal, Monroe County, Ohio. Operations began in 1956. An 8-acre lagoon on the property contains 10 to 12 feet of sludge and 25 feet in some locations. The sludge is contaminated with cyanides, fluorides, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Use of the lagoon ended in 1981. Other wastes that have been stored in the open or disposed on-site include large quantities of "spent potlinings" containing cyanide and fluorides, and possibly spent chlorinated solvents. Storage in the open stopped in 1980.

Ground water beneath the facility is contaminated with cyanides and fluorides, according to analyses conducted in 1984 by a consultant to Ormet. The well that provides drinking water for over 3,000 employees of Ormet and nearby Consolidated Aluminum Corp. is 1,970 feet from the site.

Untreated water from the facility, as well as contaminated ground water, discharges to the Ohio River. Ormet is studying the ground water problem and operating interceptor wells that pump contaminated ground water (without treatment) into the river.

Status (July 22, 1987): On March 27, 1987, EPA and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency negotiated an Administrative Order by Consent with Ormet Corp. to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study to determine the type and extent of contamination at the site, including the discharges to the Ohio River, and identify alternatives for remedial action.